What did Modi ‘actually’ accomplish in the US?

Modi - the redeemer :)

                                                Modi – the redeemer :)                                                (Reuters)

Setting up disclaimers as usual. What I write is purely my opinion. The opinion is that of a lay person not very well versed in the political sciences.

As you can see the media coverage and the general energy of the public, there is quite a bit of song and dance surrounding the PMs visit to the US. So what exactly is he accomplishing here?

Change the impression: India used to be called the land of snakes and snake charmers. Quite obviously, this pisses off a large populace . The only change in perception/impression that we have made to this is, now, India is looked at a land of cows, software engineers, and call centers.

India is considered an extremely difficult place to do business. It is considered a ‘dirty place’. (Yes, it hurts me to say this, but please drive down to the passport office in Koramangala, Bangalore and look across the street. You will know what I mean). Owing to the perception of call centers and the large scale monotonous work that we did during Y2K, we are not quite looked at where there is innovation and breakthroughs. Folks in the US still consider that the Indians in the US are super brilliant because they are ‘away’ from India.

Modi’s speeches in the US and his interactions with congressmen and leaders of businesses have revolved around allaying their fears around these factors (and probably more). I believe his trip is trying to prove to them that his new government’s top priority is to fix these basic infrastructural problems. He is probably also asking their opinions on what they consider as a problem; and if there is a large scale need for any specific SOPS he will probably do it.

Market Make in India: This whole concept has multiple facets in itself. Bring investment into India – which in itself is a big thing. This would improve the job situation in India. Also, Modi has been talking a lot about Public-Private-Partnership (PPP). Almost every MNC has money allocated for community service. That is one half of the PPP problem instantaneously solved. I read somewhere that he is already talking with Google and the likes for the Clean Ganga project. The third important factor is, as more and more product manufacturing companies come into India, their products would start getting sold in India. Goods made in India and sold here typically are also available at a lower cost. (case in point – Nokia phones, Ford cars etc). It is a win-win for the companies (expand the market) and India (lower costs).

Get some international publicity:  We need this. We need this bad. Let us accept the fact that, if you make a lot of noise in the US, it gets heard world wide. If you go and make a lot of noise in SriLanka or Thailand, no one even notices it – maybe your SAARC partners would, but no one else). This is free publicity. The “May the force be with you” starwars ending line may have sounded corny coming from the PM, but it surely got the attention. For heavens sake, John Oliver made a segment out of it in his HBO Last week Tonight show.

Thank folks for the $$: From what I hear, there was quite a bit of contribution from the Indian diaspora in the US for the Modi campaigns – monetarily. The PM needs to thank them and assure them that there would be the change that they had all contributed towards. If not for anything, he would require their support for 2 more terms (if all goes as per his plan :)).

These are the four ‘real’ reasons why I think Modi’s visit is significant. Any other thoughts, please write in the comments section.

 

 

 

 

Indian Americans and claiming credit …

This here, is a controversial article, where I am going to let what pulses through my heart, straight to the fingers on the keyboard – aka no thinking. I will set up my disclaimers shortly, and I would also like to say that, I am willing to stand corrected if your contra opinions have data enough to convince me.

First the disclaimers. I am a huge Modi fan. So even if there is something that seems to echo that what Modi is doing is wrong, is definitely a fault of the English language (which is a funny language, you know!). I have lived in the US, interacted with several first generation Indian Americans (who settled there in the 70s) and second generation Indians (American citizens born to first generation American Indians). In fact, I do have one very close friend of mine, who is a second generation American Indian, and we have had several talks on how they feel, the hardships they feel, and largely the search for their true identify (some have come to terms, and some have not, believe it or not!).

With these disclaimers out of the way, let me state my controversial rant first, and then see if my fingers can build around that (see, I am setting up my fingers for the blame, so if you do not like what I am saying, ‘talk to the hand’ or the ‘fingers’ to be precise). I take objection to the fact that several American Indians and unfortunately several Indians (and media too!) are stating that, Indians went to the US to ‘save India’. It is because of all their money that got pumped into India, that we are what we are now. Someone on FB (I think the guy was one of the organizers of the event at Madison Sq Garden) even gave an example of how, since they could not physically come and show their love and affection to their parents, they sent the money to buy a new couch – which apparently satisfied the parents even more than their children coming home (really???). And that apparently the money that the parents spent on the couch went into building the economy of the country.

Anyways, Indians have been going to America for a variety of reasons, and the reasons have evolved over time. In the early 60’s and 70’s there were the Indians who went to the US because it was the land of opportunity. I personally know of folks in my family who went there because their immediate family was in ‘need’. These folks had it real hard. Racism was rampant. They did not have the number of ‘Indian stores’ that exist today. They struggled. They struggled to make ends meet for themselves and they still had to send back money. And they did. They worked at gas stations. They worked at grocery stores. The works. The admirable thing about these people (in my humble opinion) was the fact that they did not make a pretense of trying to return to India. After all the struggling, they said, they were going to settle there and be there. They still were comfortable coming to India once in a while, but that was it. Home was the USA. Why do I admire them? Atleast they are not making a hypocritic pretense. They are clear.

Then came the 90s. Youngsters (including yours truly) went there to the US, because the universities were great. You would find folks saying they are going to the US for ‘higher education’. Cue: You would not hear folks saying to make ends meet for their family home. These folks did not have that much of a struggle (if you ask me!). A large portion of these folks either got financial assistance from the university or got some ‘on-campus’ jobs as we used to call it. By this time, atleast folks in the universities (thanks to the first generation folks whom we spoke about in the last paragraph) had a good opinion of the Indian students. They were hard working, smart, and could understand/speak fluent English. And hence these jobs came by. No one got paid boat loads, but got enough for sustenance. Few sent back money home. These were folks who had taken educational loans to take care of their first semester tuition and living expenses. But thats it. By the end of 90’s, the tech bubble was at its peak. By this time, not only were the Universities aware of the smart, hard working, English speaking Indians, the companies got to know as well. And they started hiring. Indians got in early and made it big. These guys sent some money home – perhaps paid for the renovation of the home that was long due – but I would not call it the revival of the economy due to them. They were settling in too. The bought a car, a house, and material comforts to lead a comfortable enriching life.

At the risk of alienating some of my batch mates, I will make another boisterous uncomfortable claim. There are clearly some of them who are clear that they are going to stay there in the US. They try and get their parents to the US once a year for a few months etc. They do ‘something’ for better living in India (perhaps buy them a couch like the Organizing person said), but essentially did all they could to make their and their parents life comfortable. I see nothing wrong with this crowd. Honestly, I am pretty proud of this crowd. Hey, their head is screwed on to the right place. They know what they want to do. They do what they can. The ones that bug me to no end are the ‘n+1′ folks, who claim every year that they would come back the next year. These are the folks who contribute to a lot of hypocrisy in the American Indian Community. These are the folks who talk about the ‘mother land’ in every party there. These are the folks who send money to Indian election campaigns here. These are the folks who claim that they are doing all this because they are going to return back to ‘desh’ once it gets better. Once it gets better. Hmm. Hmm. Ok then.

Let me move on now. The last set of folks who are in the US – perhaps now, as I write this long winded boring post, are the folks who have reached the US in the last few years. I have been observing a large number of these folks go to the US by funding themselves. “The wha ….”, you might say!. Yes, you heard me right. These guys fund their own tuition, their living expenses and everything else. From what I hear and understand, about half of these guys would defenitely come back to mother land and work in an ‘American’ company in India; and the rest would get assimilated there. Again, how many of these would claim that they would come back vs they would settle there, I do not know. Time will tell.

With these three categories, epochs if you will, of folks who immigrated in to the US, excepting for the first set of people who genuinely ‘pumped’ ‘some’ money back into India, I do not see the recent claim that the Indian American community is pumping ‘dollars’ into India to revive India. Really? Is that because of these guys that Infosys has become so big? HCL? TCS? CTS? They might not be the hot-rod startups of Silicon Valley, but boy-o-boy, do they bring in revenue or what? Revenue that brought prosperity to the folks who work in these companies. Revenue to the Government in terms of tax. There is also data somewhere (I dont recall where), that the NRI community does not even pump in that many tourist $ into the country. More $ is spent by European and Japanese tourists.

I should be fair, and should acknowledge the one data point that is in favour of this argument. There are a few handful of companies based out of America, who have come and started their Indian operations because of the initiatives by Indians in the management of these companies. They have been able to convince their American counterparts that there are smart, hard working, fluent English speaking folks back in India too. I say a handful, because, it is only a handful that came because of the Indian community there. The rest came because of capitalism. “Hey, we hire a lot of Indians here in the US, and they are getting expensive. Lets go in search of the source. Bingo. We can hire three Indians in India for the price of one in the US.”

So where is this ‘India is what it is because of the NRI community’ claim coming from? If that is what it is, then why is Modi there and introducing all these reforms in immigration? Why is he asking afresh to contribute? The VISA on arrival is not for the Caucasian Americans. It is for the US citizens born of Indian Immigrants. He said a lot of stuff indirectly. Let me try and say it in direct words here – “I am sure most of you here are not going to return back. And that is fine. But I want you to come and go freely. I want you to come and stay long periods of time. I want you to give ideas on how to improve (from your observations here in the US and elsewhere). I want you to contribute in whatever way you can.” You should notice that he did not say “you can Western-Union money to this account here to save my country”.

I am done with this long rant, but this is something that I wanted to share and probably get some conversation and opinions on. We are not perfect. We need all the help from everyone, from everywhere across the world. Modi has a vision. It is up to each one of us to realize it.

Bhaarath Maata ki Jai.

PS: I did not intend to hurt anyone’s feelings by this rant. I am just using Freedom of Speech and all that. I would love to stand corrected, if you have sufficient data to counter my data-less claims :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An afternoon with the trains …

The kiddo and me (both Railfans) were at the Bangalore Cantonment station for about 1.5 hours and we caught some nice action – about 7 trains. Pics below for public enjoyment :) (Hover over the pictures for the caption)
 










The curious case of Ra-da-ification

ragecomic1

Now, you  may ask me what the ‘Ra-da-ification’ in the title means. I feel this is best to explain by means of a simple social experiment.

Call up one of your South Indian friends and ask them to pronounce the name ‘Rathore’. The friend will dutifully pronounce it as Rathore.  Well, yeah, we know our English-Vinglish Phonetics well.

Call up one your North Indian friends (what my twitter brethren would friendly call as an ‘Amit’). He would without hesitation pronounce it as ‘Rathode’. Yes, as in Cathode.

Ah. I see half of my south Indian friends stare in disbelief at the apparent ‘wrong’ pronunciation; and the other half smiles smugly with a ‘been-there-given-up’ look.

When I encountered this for the first time, when I was working in Noida, I, being the freshly minted engineer, tried to use my maximum level analytical capability (however low that may be, but the fullest of it) to try to get to the bottom of it.  This *ahem* curious case of ra-da-ification happens in several words and not limited to nouns (which purists might argue need not be bound by rigid phonetic rules). The one other similar word that still brings a terror among engineering folks from the South to an esteemed college in Uttaranchal – Roorkee. Yes. Roorkee as we all called it, but were shocked to be corrected as Rudkee. Unfortunately, having given up the fight quite a long while ago, I do not remember any non-nouns to list in this blog post today.

I tried asking my Delhi friends about this, since it seemed to be a very Delhi specific thing. But soon, I realized that it is not a geographical problem, but a linguistic problem, that I had set out to solve. Even those who were not from Delhi, but went to their ‘gaon’ for their holidays – aka other folks from North India who worked in Delhi.

Some folks tried telling me that, it is a special kind of ‘da’. But tell me, is the phonetic for the English letter ‘D’ closer to (whatever kind of) ‘da’ or is the phonetic for the English letter ‘R’ closer. My 4 year old will tell me ‘D for ddadadaaada’.

It must also be noted that, not every ra is da-ified. It is slyly made so on in unsuspecting areas. And yes, I did research deep into finding if there are any grammatical rules when I should say it as da vs ra. Is it got to do anything with masculine or feminine? Nope (thank God, that is another of those difficult things in Hindi – A bus is masculine whereas a train is feminine – Dont ask !!). So, does it got it do with nouns only? Nope. At last I thought I found it. It is da only when there is already a ra in the word preceding it – like in Rathore and Roorkee. The hindi fraternity pointed out a few exceptions with ease. Back to head bang time.

I still recall distinctly the day I gave up this fight. It was the day when one of coworkers took pity on me and made this comment —

There are no rules for this thing. It just comes to us over generations. We call it rathode because our grandparents also called it so. It is a neat way for us to figure out the native hindi speakers from the non-native hindi speakers.

Phew, Not only did that prove to me that this was an intractable problem, but also gave me a false sense of bravado. The sense of pride that, some of us were so good at Hindi, that they needed some complex codification solution to figure us out.

There are still some times, when it gets me – like for example – Ninja Hatori is a Japanese comic character that plays regularly on the Pogo channel. When you turn it to Hindi voice over, the great folks at Tata Sky now call it “Ninja Hatodi”. Aaaahhhhhhhhh.  Just for the sake of getting back all of those frustrated moments, I now take sporadic revenge by making my North Indian friends say Vaazha pazham in Tamizh.

Mannaar from Mayavaram – A Short Train Story for Kids

Mannaar was the friendly diesel engine driver from Mayavaram. He drove the Mayavaram Mysore Express every other day.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/abhinavnfr/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/abhinavnfr/

One day, as usual, he finished his evening snacks, took his nap, and then boarded his familiar blue diesel engine locomotive. It was late as usual, but he knew he could make up time on the way.

By the time he got to Kumbakonam, he was very tired and sleepy. He had not slept well the previous night. He found Singaaram, another engine driver friend lounging at the Kumbakonam station.

300274368_1700d145fe_z

https://www.flickr.com/photos/floydgal

“Will you help me drive the loco until Trichy? By that time, I can have a small nap. You can catch the Trichy Kumbakonam passenger back.”

Singaaram was a helpful friend. He agreed and took on driving the blue diesel loco. The track between Kumbakonam to Trichy through Tanjore has lots and lots of level crossings. So Singaaram was honking all the way to Trichy.

When they reached Trichy, our friend Mannaar had just fallen asleep. He pleaded with Singaaram – “Please, my friend. Can you please drive on until Salem? I could not sleep a bit with all the honking.”

Singaaram did not have any other plans. So he agreed. After all, Salem was not too far away. The blue diesel loco chugged through Karur and Erode and eventually reached Salem.

By that time, our dear friend Mannaar was deep in slumber. So deep in sleep he was, that Singaaram could not even wake him up. Singaaram did not have any other choice than to drive on.

2357074081_416283e57c_z

https://www.flickr.com/photos/abrinsky/

It was day break by the time they reached Hosur. Mannaar rose from his deep sleep, fresh as a daisy. “Singaaram, my friend, let me buy you a coffee”. He jovially said, “Since you have driven all the way to Hosur, and there is no return train right now, come, let us ride to Bangalore, which is only one more hour away.”

Singaaram realized that Mannaar had been fooling with him all along. But then they were friends, and Singaaram did not mind helping friends. The Mayavaram Mysore Express chugged in to the Bangalore Central station.

 

14553416108_7889948190_z

Singaaram got off the train. Mannaar bade him good bye and went on his way to Mysore.

PS: I told this improv story to my kid last week, and he totally enjoyed it. Hence I thought I would share it here.

 

Big Basket Features that I would love!

testimonialpage_01

image: bigbasket.com

I have been a big fan of BigBasket.com for quite a while now. While I love walking by the supermarket aisles and ‘discovering’ new products, bigbasket has taken away the stress of monthly grocery shopping for the family. To be fair, I should also disclose the fact that, we alternate buying weekly vegetables from bigbasket and our local HOPCOMS vegetable store (walking distance).

I had been thinking of a few things that bigbasket could introduce to make it even better. Having been a program manager (in a previous live at Microsoft), the first thing you do is to write a feature set / requirement spec. Here goes!

Weekly vegetable delivery. This is something similar to Amazon Fresh in select areas of the US. Most of India shops for veggies once a week, for a week. There is usually a preference on vegetables in most households. The vegetables could be a randomized set. (This is a common pain point when you buy veggies – what veggies did you buy last week – no one wants a repeat, leave alone several repeats). Ofcourse, no one minds repeats of favourite veggies (um, potato?). Send an email on Friday or Saturday listing a proposed selection of vegetables that would be delivered on Sunday. This would let the user to potentially tweak the order set. Guarantee freshness delivered at your door step, every weekend morning. I am sure you will get a bunch of customers asap.

Grocery is something that is fairly predictable too. Pulses, masalas, and other house hold goods are typically purchased at a roughly similar frequency. There is some infra that is already available with bigbasket for this – in the form of smart basket. I got this idea from looking at my own shopping analytics that is available at bigbasket right now. If I can see it, so can the system, and make a prediction.

Festivals and Diets: You can incorporate all kinds of smarts into this too. Suggest more ghee and sugar during festive seasons like Diwali maybe? Suggest baking accessories during Christmas maybe? How about incorporating your diet plan into this as well? If you get broccoli every week, would you throw it away? Always suggest low sodium salt?

Recipes: Hey ! You are throwing in a bunch of veggies, and you know the other groceries that you have delivered recently, why cant you put together 2 recipes per week using these ingredients. Simple pictorial ones. Easy to understand, and prepare. Even better, add one or two more exotic ingredients (for free), which in conjunction with the veggies delivered and the groceries that you recently delivered, would make a super exotic meal. This is marketing for those two exotic ingredients. If they like this recipe, now, you have a regular customer for 2 more of your offerings.

Secret box: There are a few start-ups in the US that are attempting this now. For a monthly subscription, they will deliver a monthly surprise box containing cosmetics or snacks, or other similar consumable stuff. This is a great marketing tie-up opportunity with partners. Drop in a couple of satchets of the newest flavour of Saffola Oats – carefully concealed in some secret wrapping of course (to enhance the interest) for free with your delivery. Notice the delight in the customers attitude. You can also link this line item with the previous (recipe) for even more customer delight goodness.

Delivery: What if the customer does not really want you to deliver home? Get up early on a sunday morning to a doorbell? Really? I bet the idea of bigbasket kiosks are already running the rounds inside your org now. You should, and yes, I mean, you should, introduce kiosks for ordering and taking delivery of orders. Best place for these kiosks for the yuppie crowd would be malls and IT parks.

Well to paraphrase ‘Sound of Music’, these are a few of my favourite things. I would love Big basket to come up with these features. And I would be the first one to trial these out !! And well, yeah, to be fair, thanks BigBasket for letting me do some PM stuff that I had not done in quite a while.

Bangalore – Shirdi – Pandharpur

This is a guest post from my father. Father and Mother had done a 4 day 3 night trip to Shirdi and Pandharpur from Bangalore.

~~~~

First Day

  1. Left by Karnataka Express to Kopergaon (Shirdi access) at 7-20 pm. Comfortable journey with good catering service.
  2. Reached Kopergaon (KPG) at 2.00PM 45 minutes late.
  3. Kopergaon to Shirdi about 15 to 16 Kms. Separate auto Rs 300.
  4. Checked into to Prebooked A/C room at Sai Ashram Bhakta Nivas, a 2000 room accommodation complex by Sai Samasthan. A wonderfully created infrastructure with a sorry state of maintenance. The Sai Samasthan need to take a very serious view if they have to maintain the complex in good shape. Highly recommended to stay in one of the good hotels in the nearby vicinity until the maintanence problem is fixed.shirdi1
  5. Sai Dharshan through tickets booked on line. Good Dharshan and pleasant experience.
  6. Visit to other places like Dwarakamai, Chavadi and other places within the Temple.
  7. Mukh Dharshan (A Dharshan of Sai Baba) from a hall from a little distance. Good view of the entire Sai Baba from here.
  8. Snack at Sukh Sagar a restaurant near gate — Good Bombay Chat.
  9. Night Arathi (10.15 PM) through admission pre-booked on line. Systematic admittance till going into the Deity main hall. After entry it was like in a Mumbai Suburban train during peak hours. Once the Arathi starts people get adjusted to that.

Second Day:

  1. Morning after breakfast (7.30 AM) come out of the Bhakti Nivas. Lot of operators waiting to take you to Sani Shignapur (Sani temple). They charge Rs 120 per person for two way journey.
  2. We chose a Force Motors Long Chasis Carrier (they pack 14 people).We got a middle seat (4seats).We have to wait for almost 45 minutes before starting.
  3. Good decision to take the Force Vehicle taking the very bad condition of the National Highway which we have to take. It would have been a night mare with a Maruthi Omni or a Tata Ace.
  4. We reach Sani Shignapur (65 Kms from Shirdi) after 75 minutes’ drive. Since we reached early no crowd and we have a good Dharshan of the open deity. The deity a black stone in the open surrounding. Very nice Dharshan.shanishigna
  5. On our way back we could see lot of vehicles zipping past indicating the buildup of crowd going to Shani Signapur.
  6. After reaching Shirdi back at about 1.00 PM Lunch at Woodlands (duplicate) opposite to Sai Temple. (Slightly highly priced but good.) Rasam Vada, Sev Puri, Bakala Bath and Mysore Coffee.
  7. Again Dharshan at Mukh Dharshan Hall.
  8. Leave for Kopergaon little early by about 7.15 PM as we have to reach Kopergaon well in time to go to Solapur by Maharashtra Express slip coach to Solapur. The train reaches Kopergaon at 9.50 PM. The train arrives on time. Till the last moment the Railways do not announce the platform, which puts the passengers to lot of anxiety and makes you run helter and shelter
  9. Though the stopping time was one minute, the train halted for 90 minutes to allow crossings for 4 trains.

Third day

  1. Maharashtra express reached Daund at 3.00AM, 45 minutes late.
  2. The slip compartment to Solapur was expected to be attached to Chennai Mail at 5.15 AM which arrived at 7.30 AM and so the train reached Solapur at 11.15 AM 2hours late.
  3. This leg of the journey was the worst. The condition of the sleeper coach with the nightmarish toilets emanating stench which could make one swoon. Further parking the compartment in a dead end platform for 4.30 hours made it into an open toilet for all the people living their life in the platform.
  4. At last reached Solapur and checked into Surya International (not the executive hotel but the older one) which looked a heaven after the nightmarish journey.
  5. Decent hotel which charged Rs 1400 plus taxes for a deluxe non A/c accommodation.
  6. Hired a car (Suzuki Desire A/C) through the hotel for visit to Pandharpur (Rs 2000). Good car with a descent driver.
  7. Solapur – Pandharpur is 68 Kms one way and takes 75 minutes’ drive.
  8. Though we have obtained Pre-booked pass through internet, luckily we don’t have to use it since there was no crowd. We had a good Dharshan.
  9. Pleasant experience is there is no touts to pester you.
  10. The whole trip to and fro Pandharpur took 3.15 hours.

    Pandharpur_Vithoba_temple

    (image courtesy:wikipedia)

  11. Reached the station Solapur well in advance and since our departure time by the Solapur- Yeshwantpur super-fast express at 7.20 PM is linked with Mumbai Mail from Chennai, quite a good spread of food like Idly,Vada etc. were available (otherwise everywhere only Vada pav and Bread Sandwich only.

Fourth day

  1. Reached Yeshwantpur on time at 7.10AM after a pleasant journey in the train.14783638006_95ab41dd50_z

Book Review: Sceptical Patriot

I had been wanting to read this book for a while. I have followed the author (@sidin) for quite a while on a twitter. He does write pretty well, and there were several several good reviews of the book on the twitter feed.

So when the new kindle landed up on my door step, this was the first book I bought.

  • The book starts off at a brisk gallop. Sidin gives his reasonings on why he started writing this book. And the proclamation that this would not be a dry history book, but more of an enjoyable read of Indian history and some of its misinterpretations.
  • I liked the idea of taking apart of a few ‘India facts’ and also the concept of giving a rating to it at the end of each fact. This rating shows how much of the ‘fact’ is truth.
  • I really enjoyed his in-depth research of some of the topics. Most of the history of India can actually found only in history analysis books written by Europeans. Sidin’s readings of these books saves us time, money, and energy. He condenses them wonderfully into smaller chunks we can digest.
  • There is not much of a humour (as he claims) but the light hearted writing style makes one smile at times. Well, I guess that is what humour is.
  • The chapter on the Cholas was a delight to read – it has always been one of my pet peeves that, this chapter was never covered in depth in our school history books. For the extent of the empire that the Cholas had, this deserves a full chapter in a history book. not a paragraph on the Tanjore temple.
  • Cantering on, however, one of Sidin’s choices of the India facts gets a little too dry, and this is strictly my opinion. And this is probably because of his self-confessed bias towards some areas. Any author who writes about something that he is more passionate about, will write more and with deeper interests in those areas. And yes, I am talking about the ‘India was the richest country’ fact. Perhaps, it is my aversion to economics, and ‘numbers’ in general, which put me off, but folks who like that kind of thing will surely enjoy it. Just not my cup of tea (it should actually be coffee!).
  • The last two chapters are well written. This is Sidin’s heart talking on what his dreams are. And how the facts in these books should be interpreted, and why Indians are the way Indians are. Ofcourse, this is subject to personal opinions. I agree with some parts, and am neutral to some. I am sure other readers would feel the same way too. I would go to the extent of saying, that the last chapters some times does get a little prescriptive, which might not bode too well with some readers.

On the whole an enjoyable read. It took me about 3 days of a few hours reading every day on my kindle.